haibun
crane

| Current Issue | Contents Page - This Issue | Editorial Staff | About This Journal | Submissions |
| Acceptance Criteria | Haibun Definitions | Articles | Archives | Search | Red Moon Press |

July 2013, vol 9, no 2

| Contents | Next |


Scott Duke Kominers


Nor'easter

He is young, but his face has already begun to show the premature years that pile on faster with each week spent trolling the depths. Tonight—as do many who give up mackerel to quest for champion swordfish—he comes home with empty hands.

This was a big week—a King Swordfish nibbled, wrestled, and eventually broke his line. On the way back from the docks, he stops at The Green and Yellow Parrot to regale his fellows:

"It was the biggest fish I've ever seen," he tells them.

They tell him it is the biggest fish story they have heard all week.

For the first time in six days, he enters his bedroom. The lights are out, his wife long asleep. He is worn, and touched with drink—just enough so that he fails to notice the unfamiliar smells which assault his senses as his head hits the pillow.

low tides tonight

 tomorrow
a storm


Originally published in Grey Sparrow 8, 2011.



crane