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January 2013, vol 8, no 4

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Mark Kaplon


The Parish Church of Real De Catorce

In the bright dry light of the desert the church face narrows to a single point in the sky – the cross. Inside the stained ambience of the long hall, pews lead to the semi-dome of the alter, where a figure of the One hovers on a mount, ringed and centered by pillars and flanked by two saints who kneel on either side. A threesome of women shuffle in, sit three pews ahead, putting down their pocketbooks, sunglasses and cameras. They pray with their hands together, fingers touching, arched and risen to a point above. Their faces are wet with tears.

Slumped in sundering sun
saved, by a wandering cloud
plunging the rocks in shade




crane